What’s in a name? – Farmer’s Guild

Farmers-The_Honest_Land_painted

The first 6 of the first Season 3 Guild, the Farmer’s Guild, has been released, so we have a look at the origin of their names:

 

Farmers

Farmer’s Guild

Grange

Granges were landed monastic estates used for food production, centred on a farm and out buildings and possibly a mill or a tithe barn. The word grange comes through French graunge from Latin granica meaning a granary

Peck

A peck is an  unit of dry volume, equivalent to 2 gallons or 8 dry quarts or 16 dry pints and was often used to sell grain and other goods like fruit and vegetables.

Peck also has another apt meaning which is the action a bird (like a chicken) makes with it’s beak, particularly when feeding.

Bushel

A bushel is another unit of dry volume and is the equivalent of four pecks and was mostly used for agricultural goods such as wheat. The name comes from the Old French boissiel and buissiel, meaning “little box”.

Harrow

A harrow is an agricultural implement consisting of many spikes, tines or discs dragged across the soil to break up and smooth out it’s surface.  It is distinct in its effect from the plough, which is used for deeper tillage. The purpose of harrowing is generally to break up clods (lumps of soil) and to provide a finer finish, suitable for seedbed use. Coarser harrowing may also be used to remove weeds and to cover seed after sowing.

Jackstraw

A jackstraw is an obsolute term used to describe a straw-stuffed figure of a man or scarecrow.

Windle

A windle is another unit of dry volume, particularly used as  a measure of corn, wheat, or other commodities, equal to approximately three bushels.

Until next time sports fans!

 

 

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